Cave Rock Blasted during War

The Cave Rock Bluff in Durban is arguably the best surfing spot in South Africa. A reef and underwater channel just off the shore makes the break at Cave Rock similar to those found in Hawaii. Most Durbanites would not have heard of ‘Cave Rock’, and this is not surprising, for Cave Rock no longer […]

The Cave Rock Bluff

in Durban is arguably the best surfing spot in South Africa. A reef and underwater channel just off the shore makes the break at Cave Rock similar to those found in Hawaii.

Most Durbanites would not have heard of ‘Cave Rock’, and this is not surprising, for Cave Rock no longer exists. Well – as a landmark, tourist attraction, natural wonder and picnic spot it no longer exists – but as a pile of rocks it does, for it was dynamited in the 1940′s by the South African War Department. The Army needed a clear light path for the searchlights during the war.

cave

For many hundreds of thousands of years this large sandstone formation stood proudly at the Bluff headland, witnessing the centuries rolling on like the ocean waves. It was there that Christmas Day in 1497 when Vasco da Gama sailed up the coast in his rickety wooden carrack the 178 ton Sao Gabriel, looking for his route to the East.

Cave Rock’s legendary big-wave surf conditions draw a diverse array of visitors, but the huge waves here make it suitable for experienced surfers only.

Surfers from all over the world flock to Cave Rock to ride the perfect tubular waves when large south swells break across the solid rock reef. At low tide, there are various rock pools with all sorts of marine life.