Rationing of Water Begins in KZN

Ethekwini Region Begins Water Rationing. The drought situation in KwaZulu-Natal is taking a turn for the worse. This emerged when the MEC for Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, Ms Nomusa Dube-Ncube met with Mayors from affected Municipalities. The province will see water restrictions being in imposed by the municipalities in order to contain the drastic […]

Ethekwini Region Begins Water Rationing.

The drought situation in KwaZulu-Natal is taking a turn for the worse. This emerged when the MEC for Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, Ms Nomusa Dube-Ncube met with Mayors from affected Municipalities.

The province will see water restrictions being in imposed by the municipalities in order to contain the drastic effects of the prevailing drought, gripping KwaZulu-Natal. The rationing came into effect yesterday after the department announced last week that the ongoing drought, the worst since 1991 has led to a crisis in KwaZulu-Natal. Here is the latest schedule which is on the Ethekwini www.durban.gov.za website which was released today:

water schedule
WATER RATIONING SCHEDULE – Source www.durban.gov.za

In a statement released on Sunday, Dube-Ncube said:

“Today some municipalities will commence with radical water rationing programmes as part of managing the available water resources. Water rationing means that water production will be reduced and, as a result of this water reduction, less water will be supplied to municipalities. This will have a knock-on effect on consumers who will be given a set of amount of water per day once the water quantum allocated to households is consumed, there will be no water available until the following day when a new amount is allocated.
We face a harrowing future if we do not take extraordinary measures to conserve the remaining water. In some areas we are left with only 2 months of water supply and we are just at the beginning of the dry winter season for most parts of our province,” said Dube-Ncube.

“We require major changes in policy and consumer behaviour to manage the current water crisis in our province. Today, not tomorrow, is the time to begin to change the way we treat water by conserving every drop,” added Dube-Ncube.

Water Shortages in KZN

The public must take ownership of this issue. This crisis belongs to all of us — not just to a handful of decision-makers. Water is our most important, commonly shared resource, but the public remains detached from discussions and decisions about water management and use. We have a problem with rain and dams are getting empty.
Water rationing timetables will be issued on a weekly basis and consumers and municipalities are urged to take note of water allocations available and use water sparingly. The less prudent we are with water, the higher the risk of water shortages we will face,” said Dube-Ncube.

Ethekwini Municipality, Ilembe (Stanger, Ballito, Ndwedwe) and uThungulu (Richards Bay, uMfolozi etc) Mtubatuba will be the most affected regions.
“Water rationing means that water production will be reduced and, as a result of this water reduction, less water will be supplied to municipalities. This will have a knock-on effect on consumers who will be given a set of amount of water per day once the water quantum allocated to households is consumed, there will be no water available until the following day when a new amount is allocated.”

The northern areas of eThekwini and the southern areas of Illembe, which are supplied by Hazelmere Dam, are expected to be the worst affected.
Last week Dube-Ncube said Hazelmere Dam had a mere two months supply of water remaining if restrictions were not implemented.

“We require major changes in policy and consumer behaviour to manage the current water crisis in our province. Today, not tomorrow, is the time to begin to change the way we treat water by conserving every drop,” she said.

“Water rationing timetables will be issued on a weekly basis and consumers and municipalities are urged to take note of water allocations available and use water sparingly. The less prudent we are with water, the higher the risk of water shortages we will face,” said Dube-Ncube.